Volleyball Positions on the Court Every Player Should Know

Volleyball Positions on the Court
Volleyball, as a team game, demands perfect coordination from the players who are on different positions. The article below depicts the various volleyball positions on the court.
Quite a popular game, the objective of volleyball is the grounding of a ball from one team on other team's court. There must be quite a few instances, where you may have heard words, like setter, libero, and so on. For the players, this is an everyday affair. They hear these words in and out, and are expected to be proficient about the game - regarding positions, player duties, court dimensions, etc. A layman, however, is not aware of the game's jargon, positions, and rules. If you wish to understand a game of volleyball with intricacy, the article below will provide you some information about the different volleyball positions on the court.

Volleyball Positions - Players

Setter

A setter is one who sets the game off and a team's attack. It is akin to what a quarterback does in American Football. An offense of a team is unleashed by a setter.

Outside Hitter

An outside hitter attacks close to the position of the left antenna. The most consist of the lot, he gains maximum number of sets for a team.

Middle Hitter

Those attacks that made close to the setter and are very fast are done by a middle hitter. Typically, these attacks take place close to the setter. They are experts in blocking and attempt equally strong attacking shots from the opponents.

Libero

This player holds the fort for the defense and takes the responsibility of the serve and attack. They normally have the best passing skills and quickest reaction time.

Opposite Hitter

An opposite hitter takes the burden off the defense for a team and is stationed in the first row. Their main job is to put up a strong block to nullify the opponent team's outside hitters. They can also double up as backup setters. This is one of the very important positions.

Volleyball positions and numbers, basically depend on the kind of formation a team has. The most common formation for a volley ball team is a 6-2 formation. In such a formation, there are two setters, and all the 6 players can act as attackers at different phases of the game. These formations keep changing and players are rotated.

Volleyball Positions - Court

Right Back

This is the primary position for a team on a court. A setter normally serves from this spot. This player is in rotation in the back court on the right side. During a rotation, a player getting in the right back position gets to serve.

Right Front

To describe in simple terms, the player who stands right in front of the Right back is the right front. So, basically, a player in this position is close to the net dividing the court, on the right hand side.

Middle Front

This player is at the net, in the center and is a rotation position. As the name suggests, this player is in the middle of the court, from a team's playing area.

Left Front

This is the attack position and as the name goes, on the left side of the court. The player who is in left front is more often than not an outside hitter. In case there is a rotation, sometimes right side hitter or opposite hitter plays in that position.

Left Back

This is the spot at the left end corner of a team's playing area. Liberos play in this position. If there is a rotation, the middle blockers play alternatively in this position, after his or her serve. Post-serve, the libero chips in for the middle blocker.

Middle Back

Normally, what happens is a middle hitter starts the game on this position in the line up. But then, he is substituted by a libero, who is a specialist 'back bencher' preceding the first serve. Sometimes, even outside hitters can play in middle back position, which gives them a chance to attack well.

Finally, it is all about skill, agility, and quick reflexes, which wins team a game. A collective effort is what is the key to the success of a volleyball team, just like Earvin Johnson, aka Magic Johnson said, "Ask not what your teammates can do for you. Ask what you can do for your teammates."
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